On Friday I announced the upcoming 30 Days of Hustle Challenge (if you missed it, details are here). I'm opening up early bird registration in a couple of weeks. Before I do, I have two quick questions I would love your help with today. In my...

Last year, people started to bring me queso at book signing events. I actually found a job where people give me melted cheese. Take that, guidance counselor who told me my dreams couldn't come true! If 2014 was the year of queso, then 2015 seems to be the year of the online course. It seems everyone and their grandmother has an online course. It's easy to be wowed by what some of these courses offer. Their sales pages are shiny, their testimonials are compelling, and the promises they make all but assure you a better life is just a few clicks away. The offer of magical "passive income" is a particularly bright carrot that is waved as an enticement. The Internet is littered with get rich quick schemes. There are no shortcuts. Anyone who tells you differently is usually trying to sell you a shortcut. [Tweet "There are no shortcuts. Anyone who tells you differently is usually trying to sell you a shortcut. "] But the 1.7 billion course options you get when you search Google can't all be that great, right? So how do you figure out which one is worth your time, energy, and money? Here's how I do it. I ask these three questions whenever I'm considering an online course.

I'm not sure when my hearing problem started but here's what it looks like: When someone says, "I doubt you can do that," I hear, "I dare you to do that." [Tweet "When someone says, "I doubt you can do that," I hear, "I dare you to...

When I write, I start by creating an “honest draft.” That means I suspend that part of myself that is desperately thinking, “Will people like this? Will people like me? Will they be mad or happy with this sentence?” I struggle with wanting everyone on the...

My friend produces albums. (If you live in Nashville for longer than 19 minutes you too will be able to say that sentence.) He often meets young musicians and noticed that their narrative is changing. The new thing that fresh off the bus musicians  tell him...

“Do what you love and you’ll never work a day in your life.” That’s one of those syrupy, motivational statements you see floating about the Internet. It’s often plastered on a photo of someone standing on a vista overlooking a mountain range, the ocean, a unicorn or all three if you happen to live in the Pacific Northwest where those items are all found. Is it true though? If you find something you love doing, will you never work a day in your life? If you discover a passion that fills you up, will you ever have to work again? If you dig up your calling from the millions of options and find the “one,” does your sense of work end? The short answer, for the population of people who are no longer reading long blogs, is no. The long answer, for those who like long form ideas, is still no. I spent 15 years working in corporate America. Twenty-one months ago, I had a huge Do Over and ended up writing full time. I secretly believed that since I loved writing, I would never have to work again. I thought that any sort of drudgery or disappointment or hard work was behind me.

The economy will never be perfect enough for you to be brave. If you were waiting for that to happen, go ahead and cross that off the list of “Reasons you’re not doing what you’re supposed to do.” Hopefully that list is getting shorter, because your days...

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